I COME FROM EVERYWHERE AND EVERYWHERE I GO

YO VENGO DE TODAS PARTES Y HACIA TODAS PARTES VOY

OPENING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2017 4-8 PM  

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA is a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Supported by grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA takes place from September 2017 through January 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California, from Los Angeles to Palm Springs, and from San Diego to Santa Barbara. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty.

Lois Lambert Gallery is proud to participate in this event exhibiting work from Cuban artists Alejandro Gómez Cangas, Maykel Linares, Darwin Estacio Martinez, Luis Rodriguez NOA, Adislen Reyes Pino, and Eduardo Rubén from September 9th through November 4th, 2017. In addition Lois Lambert Gallery will also be exhibiting Rodrigo Branco, a Brazilian painter and mural artist, from January 13th through March 4th, 2018.


 

FEATURED CUBAN ARTISTS:

  • ADISLEN REYES PINO
  • LUIS RODRIGUEZ 'NOA'
  • EDUARDO RUBEN
  • ALEJANDRO GOMEZ CANGAS
  • MAYKEL LINARES
  • DARWIN ESTACIO MARTINEZ

September 9th Artist Talk 4pm

Each artist will discuss their work at Lois Lambert Gallery and how it relates to the title of the exhibition ; “Yo Vengo de Todas Partes y Hacia Todas Partes Voy”/ “I Come From Everywhere and Everywhere I Go”.

The title is from the poem (I Am a Sincere Man) written in 1891 by the poet, writer, and revolutionary José Martí. Martí was exiled from Cuba for publicly expressing his beliefs  for the independence of his country. In exile he traveled extensively, learning about varied cultures, making him rather worldly for his time. “I come from everywhere and everywhere I go” could be translated as a proclamation to a borderless identity.

Today’s artists in Cuba enjoy the privilege of traveling the world,  showing their work, sharing their culture, and learning from their travels. This exposure allows Contemporary artists in present Cuba to share Martí’s perspective.

There will be borders crossed. There will be art. A celebration without borders.


ALEJANDRO GOMEZ CANGAS

 

Cangas' work depicts the rainbow of humanity in kaleidoscopic motion focusing on the tension that each person experiences as they try to assert and maintain their individuality. Alejandro’s paintings often show crowds of people waiting in line or walking together towards an unknown situation. Alejandro creates these scenes by taking photographs of individuals walking alone, collages them and Cangas’ work is focused on how the uses them as a reference point for his paintings. individual fits within society and the difficulties one may have navigating their movements and their thoughts in relation to others.

MAYKEL LINARES

Maykel Linares’ work is a reaction to the sentimental content of popular imagery that awakens in the viewer empirical associations. In this collection of paintings there is a strong link to the landscapes often seen in the paintings of the Surrealists like De Chirico, Magritte and even Dalí.

There are two concepts essential to Maykel’s work one is the reaffirmation of the individual and his private space. This concept is a natural reaction to the gregariousness of Cuban society. The second focuses on the displacement of populations leading to the culture of the Nomad.

In exploring the idea of the nomad and displacement Maykel
uses recurrent patterns in his work. The idea of flight, places
of passage, and the four seasons of the year are captured in his work. Linares idealizes open spaces, always seeking to portray the amplitude of the great outdoors as infinite. Linares’ paintings demonstrate a world familiar but still distant from reality.

 

DARWIN ESTACIO MARTINEZ

 

Darwin Estacio Martinez uses a universally understood visual language to convey unfinished stories like still images taken from a movie. Darwin takes those moments of an embrace, a handshake or other human interactions and zooms in, fragmenting the figures into mysterious compositions of bold color. By doing this the artist shifts the emphasis from the gesture and figure over to the mood or intention of the scene. Martinez’s paintings are deliberately open to interpretation. There is always a general understanding of what is happening in the painting but each painting does not have an assigned meaning. “It’s amazing how for the Cuban people my paintings hide some political statements, and for the French or Italian they relate my work to the world of sexuality”. 

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ADISLEN REYES PINO

Adislen Reyes Pino’s work is inspired by her generation's angst concerning Cuba's uncertain future. Pino's drawings from her "Nightmare" series differs from her earlier series "Crisis" in that it uses a black background that adds a more tragic tone to the small narratives that her drawings depict. Both series will be shown together in this exhibit.

Pino draws in simple small-scale outlines, almost childlike, seemingly in conflict with the images of the anxiety provoking situations she is portraying. However, the contrast is all the more provocative.

 

LUIS RODRIGUEZ 'NOA'

Luis Rodriguez NOA’s paintings depict the fleeting moments of daily life in the city of Havana—like a couple drinking wine by the pier, a man watching TV alone, children on bicycles, or airplanes crossing the sky. NOA illustrates all of this activity and more in each composition through a colorful expression of both comedy and tragedy. NOA is drawn to what he calls “the true expression of the subjective.” He does very little planning before he begins a painting and makes his decisions for the composition as he mixes his acrylics directly on the canvas or paper. “If I had to summarize my work I would say they are free expressions of creativity and a meeting of the intuitive and rational. They exist between the common place and the fantastical.”

EDUARDO RUBEN

Eduardo Rubén’s paintings are a reinterpretation of the visual experience in Cuba, as well as, the psychological and emotional reality of daily life. This exhibition will be a continuation of his ongoing series “Combatants”, large black and white acrylic paintings that depict broken concrete monuments reflective of all the abandoned, deteriorating, and half-constructed buildings in Cuba. These depictions of twisted, worn out building remains withbent rebar, and deteriorating columns are sad monuments of the tragic characters of Cuba’s past and present. Eduardo’s intention is to illustrate through painting, ideas of heroism and stoicism, which are fundamental to the portrayal of Cuban history.